ABOUT THE AUTHOR

JEAN MURRAY MUNDEN is a 76-year-old widow who has been engaged in storytelling in one form or another since she was a child. She grew up in a small town, moved to the city at 16, and then trained as a nurse in a large city hospital after she finished high school. She practiced her profession for only a short time before marrying a widower with three lovely children. They had a son of their own, traveled extensively, and a happy marriage of nearly 49 years. She lives alone, maintaining close ties with her family, and writes at her leisure.

ABOUT THE BOOK

On a trip to Scotland, Robin Lindsay, a 45-year-old Canadian widow, meets James Maclachlan, a Scottish widower.

James is haunted by his poor relationship with his wife, who died under mysterious circumstances nearly 10 years ago, leaving a daughter and infant son. The couple fall in love, but events emerging from the past, and violent murder in the present, complicate matters.

“It’s a blessing to witness love being expressed and this book was a wonderful demonstration of such. I highly recommend this book to everyone because as they say, ‘love conquers all’ and there was more than enough to go around.”

-Rae C. Bernard, Pacific Review of Books

“Presented in a conversational style, the author skillfully develops the characters through their own voice, crafting a delightful tone that carries through to the final scene. Readers who enjoyed L. M. Montgomery’s Anne of Green Gables series will be enthralled with this charming tale of love and embracing the gift of life in an ever-changing world.”

-Rae C. Bernard, Pacific Review of Books

ABOUT THE BOOK

Twenty year old Lulu Ferris visits her grandmother, Louise, to discuss her love life —Lulu, already engaged to be married, has suddenly fallen in love with a man some years older than she. Louise contemplates the problem by reflecting on her own past and the two loves she experienced. She also ponders her relationship with her two sisters and the effect of war on families.

Set in Ottawa, Ontario, Prince Edward Island, and Vancouver, B.C., the story covers 70 years beginning from the outset of the First World War to the present (the 80s where Lulu’s dilemma may or may not be resolved).

BOOK REVIEWS

A love story that spans seventy years and three generations of a family. It starts out with a granddaughter coming to the grandmother she adored and telling her she is in love with someone new,even though she is engaged to her childhood sweetheart. This sets the grandmother thinking back on her life, her children’s and now her grandchildren’s.

I purchased this book at the recommendation of a friend. I was told the publisher shares the first chapter of this book on their web site. The story pulled me in so quickly–I discovered I wanted to read more. After getting my copy, I didn’t want to put it down. I thought it was just me and have shared it with friends. Now my friends have read it and they agree that the story is informative, intriguing, has content, and could happen in real life. We can’t wait to get Jean’s next book.

Eastern Shore Reader

I loved the twist at the end. Many historical facts. Loved it!

Amazon Customer

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I'll Remember April | Book Trailer

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Indie Reader Review

I’LL REMEMBER APRIL

Eight-eight year old Louise lives a quiet, happy life, surrounded by her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren in Jean Murray Munden’s I’LL REMEMBER APRIL.

 Of them all, she is closest to her namesake Lulu, the daughter of her youngest son. Lulu is twenty, an aspiring writer and engaged to married. She thinks she has her life all figured out. But one fine spring day she comes to visit her grandmother with a dilemma. 

COME FILL UP MY CUP

The magical Scottish Highlands bloom vividly to life in COME FILL UP MY CUP by Jean Murray Munden, with descriptions detailed enough to that enable readers to feel almost as if they were there. 

The location is rich in snowbound winters, muddy roads, and the rushing rivers of springtime and the codes of conduct include never turning away someone in trouble.